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  • 2 Oct 2020 6:51 AM | Anonymous

    The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

    To mark the beginning of Black History Month UK, a range of historically rich new records join the site this Findmypast Friday. 

    Findmypast will also be celebrating Black British History on their UK blog throughout the month of October.


    Findmypast
    ’s latest record releases highlight lesser-known facets of British history, important family events in the Caribbean and much more. They include;

    London, Black Poor, 1786

    Listing destitute Londoners, this small but intriguing collection provides a glimpse into a largely forgotten chapter of Black British history.

    Over the course of 1785, it became apparent that increasing numbers of Black people were living in extreme poverty in London with no means of support. Although some were distressed mariners from both the merchant service and the Royal Navy, a significant proportion are thought to have been Black Loyalist refugees who were evacuated to Britain following American Revolutionary War.

    Great sympathy was felt for the plight of these poor Londoners and support was initially a matter of private charity, beginning with a concerned baker and a bookseller. However, it developed during early 1786 into a broader group of affluent and influential figures – abolitionists, Quakers, philanthropists and others – and became formalized as the Committee for the Relief of the Black Poor. In addition to providing a dole in the form of bread or alms, the Committee also provided healthcare facilities at a sick-house in Fitzrovia. The transcripts included in this collection document those who received support under the scheme.

    Sierra Leone Resettlement Scheme, 1787

    The Sierra Leone resettlement scheme of 1787 was designed to address the number of Black poor on the streets of London while populating the West Coast of Africa with loyalists who would establish industry and trading links in the British Colony.

    After arriving at Frenchman’s Bay in Sierra Leone on 10th May 1787, the venture soon proved unsuccessful. The new colonists were offered little to no official support and were expected to fend for themselves. There were many deaths due to disease, some hostility from the indigenous people and a number of those who did not die were captured by passing ships and sold into slavery.

    The passenger lists for the vessels provide fascinating insights and group the colonists under a number of descriptions – the most common being single black men. Each transcript includes a passenger’s name, description, marital status, embarkation date and location as well as the name of the ship they sailed on.

    Caribbean Marriage Index 1591-1905

    Findmypast’s Caribbean Collection has been bolstered with over 15,000 new marriage records from Barbados, the Dominican Republic, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and Puerto Rico.

    Dating as far back as 1591, the records can reveal useful details for the Caribbean branches of your family tree. Discover the bride and groom’s names, where and when they married and more.

    Devon Burials

    Over 19,000 additional burials from three Devon cemeteries are now available to search on Findmypast. These new additions cover:

    • Tavistock, Dolvin Road Cemetery (1834-1886)
    • Tavistock, Plymouth Road Cemetery (1882-1995)
    • Plympton, Drake Memorial Park (1943-1966)

    Use these detailed records to find out where and when your Devon ancestors were laid to rest and uncover valuable details for searching Findmypast’s wider, extensive collection of Devon family records.

    Newspapers

    Over 95,000 new pages from three brand new titles have been added to Findmypast’s collection of historical British and Irish newspapers along with updates to 15 existing titles.

    Newly-released are:

    • Stratford Express covering 1877, 1888 and 1892-1893
    • Flintshire County Herald covering 1896
    • Principality (Cardiff) covering 1880

    While more pages have been added to:

    • Runcorn Weekly News from 1963, 1971-1972 and 1974-1976
    • Liverpool Courier and Commercial Advertiser from 1892 and 1909-1910
    • Fife News from 1881, 1884 and 1887
    • Marylebone Mercury from 1947
    • Waterford News Letter from 1849 and 1869
    • John Bull from 1906-1945
    • Dundalk Herald from 1887
    • Shetland News from 1893
    • Cork Daily Herald from 1900
    • Call (London) from 1917
    • Communist (London) from 1923
    • Clare Advertiser and Kilrush Gazette from 1877
    • Cavan Weekly News and General Advertiser from 1869, 1899 and 1904
    • Strabane Weekly News from 1911
    • Ballinrobe Chronicle and Mayo Advertiser from 1880
  • 1 Oct 2020 4:00 PM | Anonymous

    Authors to Discuss New Books on Hot Springs, Ark.—America’s Forgotten Capital of Vice—and on Eleanor Roosevelt, Malcolm X, and Claire Messud— with Her Own Autobiography

    All Talks Are Free – Online Registration Is Open

    The following announcement was written by American Ancestors | New England Historic Genealogical Society:

    October 1, 2020—Boston, Massachusetts—Beginning on Thursday, October 1, at 6:00 p.m., American Ancestors and NEHGS, often in collaboration with some of Boston’s leading cultural institutions, will present a number of virtual conversations between acclaimed authors and historians featuring new works that focus on impor- tant figures and events in American history and in family history. To serve and inspire the Boston community—and curious readers Everywhere—in this unprecedented at-home time, the American Inspiration series continues in a virtual format during the fall season. Furthering its mission to engage, inspire, and connect, the roster of celebrated authors and their new books will be presented free online. American Inspiration often works in partnership with the Boston Public Library, GBH Forum, the State Library of Massachusetts, and other cultural organizations around Boston.

    Interested individuals may sign-up for the American Inspiration series e-news at AmericanAncestors.org/Inspire to stay in the know about upcoming author events. Each virtual program is broadcast live. Many are produced and recorded by the GBH Forum Network (as Zoom Video Conferencing “webinars,” with funding from the Lowell Institute). All author event videos are later published on the series website for the enrichment of the community on the series website.

    Upcoming programs in October and November in this acclaimed series are:

    • David Hill with The Vapors: A Southern Family, the New York Mob, and the Rise and Fall of Hot Springs, America’s Forgotten Capital of Vice — Thursday, October 1, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderator: Scott Steward, Editor in Chief, American Ancestors | NEHGS Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_S-ixnBUTQTWyFT4KRVUr-w
    • David Michaelis with Eleanor (Roosevelt) — Thursday, October 8, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderators: Beth Carroll-Horrocks, Head of Special Collections at the State Library of Massachusetts, and Margaret M. Talcott, Producer of the American Inspiration series. Registration: https://www.crowdcast.io/e/eleanor/register
    • Claire Messud with Kant’s Little Prussian Head and Other Reasons Why I Write: An Autobiography in Essays — Tuesday, October 20, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderator: Dani Shapiro, novelist and memoirist Registration: https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w1sp55HQSQGkNAmRNTxjzw -More- 2.
    • Tamara Payne with The Dead are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X — Thursday, November 5, at 6:00 pm EST Moderator: L’Merchie Frazier, Director of Education and Interpretation, Museum of African American History Registration: https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/7016009800026/WN_D-a-PNyaSwqFRE5zIif3Fw
    • Nathaniel Philbrick, the Boston Public Library’s Baxter Lecture on Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community and War — Thursday, November 12, at 6:00 pm EST Moderator: Ryan J. Woods, EVP and COO of American Ancestors | NEHGS For registration, sign-up to be alerted at https://hubs.americanancestors.org/american-inspiration-interest

    More information about the series and authors is available on the websites of the presenting organizations including American Ancestors│NEHGS, and co-presenters and producers WGBH Forum Network, and the Boston Public Library.

    About the American Inspiration Authors Series by American Ancestors│NEHGS 
    American Inspiration presents best-selling authors and their books exploring themes of personal identity, families and immigration, and social and cultural history. The series, launched in Fall 2019, introduced audiences to celebrated writers through a discussion of their latest works in our historic rotunda in Back Bay, Boston. To serve and inspire our audiences—and curious readers everywhere—in this unprecedented at-home time, we have partnered with the Boston Public Library, the GBH Forum, the State Library of Massachusetts, and other cultural organizations around Boston to present a virtual author series following the themes of our on-site series. More at AmericanAncestors.org/inspire.

    American Ancestors|New England Historic Genealogical Society serves as the nation’s collective memory for family history. Founded in 1845, we are the country’s oldest genealogical organization and the most respected name in the field. We bring together a broad and diverse audience seeking to understand the past by educating, inspiring, and connecting people through our scholarship, programs, collections, and expertise. Headquartered on Newbury Street in Boston, Mass., we are the research library, online resource, and nonprofit organization behind these two new author series. More at AmericanAncestors.org.

  • 1 Oct 2020 1:26 PM | Anonymous

    Did you catch Covid-19? Perhaps you should blame your ancestors.

    According to an article by Maggie Fox in the CNN website:

    “Genes inherited from Neanderthal ancestors may be involved in some cases of severe Covid-19 disease, researchers in Germany reported Wednesday.

    A team of experts on Neanderthal genetics examined a strand of DNA that has been associated with some of the more serious cases of Covid-19 and compared it to sequences known to have been passed down to living Europeans and Asians from Neanderthal ancestors.

    The DNA strand is found on chromosome 3, and a team of researchers in Europe has linked certain variations in this sequence with the risk of being more severely ill with Covid-19.

    ‘Here, we show that the risk is conferred by a genomic segment … that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50% of people in South Asia and about 16% of people in Europe today,’ Svante Paabo and Hugo Zeberg of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology wrote, in a paper accepted for publication in the journal Nature.”

    You can find the full article at: https://cnn.it/3jnaeYD.


  • 1 Oct 2020 1:21 PM | Anonymous

    Authors to Discuss New Books on Hot Springs, Ark.—America’s Forgotten Capital of Vice—and on Eleanor Roosevelt, Malcolm X, and Claire Messud—
    with Her Own Autobiography

    All Talks Are Free – Online Registration Is Open

    The following announcement was written by American Ancestors | New England Historic Genealogical Society:

    October 1, 2020—Boston, Massachusetts—Beginning on Thursday, October 1, at 6:00 p.m., American Ancestors and NEHGS, often in collaboration with some of Boston’s leading cultural institutions, will present a number of virtual conversations between acclaimed authors and historians featuring new works that focus on impor- tant figures and events in American history and in family history. To serve and inspire the Boston community—and curious readers Everywhere—in this unprecedented at-home time, the American Inspiration series continues in a virtual format during the fall season. Furthering its mission to engage, inspire, and connect, the roster of celebrated authors and their new books will be presented free online. American Inspiration often works in partnership with the Boston Public Library, GBH Forum, the State Library of Massachusetts, and other cultural organizations around Boston.


    Interested individuals may sign-up for the American Inspiration series e-news at AmericanAncestors.org/Inspire to stay in the know about upcoming author events. Each virtual program is broadcast live. Many are produced and recorded by the GBH Forum Network (as Zoom Video Conferencing “webinars,” with funding from the Lowell Institute). All author event videos are later published on the series website for the enrichment of the community on the series website.

    Upcoming programs in October and November in this acclaimed series are:

    • David Hill with The Vapors: A Southern Family, the New York Mob, and the Rise and Fall of Hot Springs, America’s Forgotten Capital of Vice — Thursday, October 1, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderator: Scott Steward, Editor in Chief, American Ancestors | NEHGS Registration: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_S-ixnBUTQTWyFT4KRVUr-w
    • David Michaelis with Eleanor (Roosevelt) — Thursday, October 8, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderators: Beth Carroll-Horrocks, Head of Special Collections at the State Library of Massachusetts, and Margaret M. Talcott, Producer of the American Inspiration series. Registration: https://www.crowdcast.io/e/eleanor/register
    • Claire Messud with Kant’s Little Prussian Head and Other Reasons Why I Write: An Autobiography in Essays — Tuesday, October 20, at 6:00 pm EDT Moderator: Dani Shapiro, novelist and memoirist Registration: https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_w1sp55HQSQGkNAmRNTxjzw -More- 2.
    • Tamara Payne with The Dead are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X — Thursday, November 5, at 6:00 pm EST Moderator: L’Merchie Frazier, Director of Education and Interpretation, Museum of African American History Registration: https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/7016009800026/WN_D-a-PNyaSwqFRE5zIif3Fw
    • Nathaniel Philbrick, the Boston Public Library’s Baxter Lecture on Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community and War — Thursday, November 12, at 6:00 pm EST Moderator: Ryan J. Woods, EVP and COO of American Ancestors | NEHGS For registration, sign-up to be alerted at https://hubs.americanancestors.org/american-inspiration-interest

    More information about the series and authors is available on the websites of the presenting organizations including American Ancestors│NEHGS, and co-presenters and producers WGBH Forum Network, and the Boston Public Library.

    About the American Inspiration Authors Series by American Ancestors│NEHGS 
    American Inspiration presents best-selling authors and their books exploring themes of personal identity, families and immigration, and social and cultural history. The series, launched in Fall 2019, introduced audiences to celebrated writers through a discussion of their latest works in our historic rotunda in Back Bay, Boston. To serve and inspire our audiences—and curious readers everywhere—in this unprecedented at-home time, we have partnered with the Boston Public Library, the GBH Forum, the State Library of Massachusetts, and other cultural organizations around Boston to present a virtual author series following the themes of our on-site series. More at AmericanAncestors.org/inspire.

    American Ancestors|New England Historic Genealogical Society serves as the nation’s collective memory for family history. Founded in 1845, we are the country’s oldest genealogical organization and the most respected name in the field. We bring together a broad and diverse audience seeking to understand the past by educating, inspiring, and connecting people through our scholarship, programs, collections, and expertise. Headquartered on Newbury Street in Boston, Mass., we are the research library, online resource, and nonprofit organization behind these two new author series. More at AmericanAncestors.org.


  • 1 Oct 2020 1:07 PM | Anonymous

    A woman who was gifted an ancestry DNA kit says she has been left with more questions than answers after she received her results back. Katye Snow told her story on TikTok and explained how she discovered the man she grew up with and called Dad wasn’t her biological father.

    “A few months ago, my lovely brother got me one of those cool ancestry genealogy tests,” Ms Snow starts the video.

    “And because my father’s adopted and my mother doesn’t know her real father I thought it was really cool to figure out my genealogy maybe find out some medical issues I don’t know about.

    She was successful in finding “some medical issues I don’t know about.”

    You can read the full story in an article by Kamilia Palu in the Yahoo News website at: https://yhoo.it/3l3qA9l.

  • 1 Oct 2020 12:54 PM | Anonymous

    Heredis is a genealogy program that is very popular around the world. I don’t hear much about it in the U.S. but also know that it is one of the most popular genealogy programs in the world. It is available in several different languages which probably explains much of its popularity.

    Heredis is also one of the easier-to-use genealogy programs available today. I have it installed on my computer and am very impressed with it.

    Now the Heredis producers (in France) have announced a major update of the program. Here is the announcement:

    MONTPELLIER, FRANCE – SEPTEMBER 22, 2020 – Besides a colorful and exciting new design to try to brighten the special times we are going through, Heredis 2021 offers great new features AND boasts a multitude of long requested improvements.

    DYNAMIC ANCESTORS WHEEL
    The genealogist can from now on visualize a 360° representation of his family tree!! This wheel shape chart can be colored by generation, gender, quarter, by marked or “complete” persons, thus highlighting the most relevant data in his genealogy file. This representation allows the genealogist to quickly visualize if any ancestor is missing in any branch without leaving the navigation tab.


    Ancestors Wheel

    The wheel chart can include up to 12 generations. It can be exported to PDF and then be printed: this is a great-looking ancestors wheel chart to share with his relatives.

    Another version of the Ancestors Wheel


    DEAD ENDS
    A father or mother can’t seem to be found? It is not uncommon to come across abandoned children or children born with unknown fathers when doing genealogical research. In most cases, chances of finding out who the parents were are quite slim. The genealogist can now categorizes such “dead ends” in a quick and easy manner by checking the Untraceable Father and Untraceable Mother boxes. At any moment, he may thus declare these persons as Complete so he can move on and focus on more fruitful researches without wasting additional time in the genealogical endeavors. Thanks to this new label, the genealogist will see right away whether any ancestor needs to be searched for or not. Navigate the family tree while keeping an eye on such information, which is worth taking into consideration as the genealogist moves forward in his researches. In the end, the research follow-up becomes more reliable when measuring the progress of searches. This information can be found in the sheets or even in your GEDCOM file.


    Searching for Dead Ends

    PERSON AS COMPLETE

    Does the genealogist know full well that he won’t find any additional information on a given person in his genealogy? He may now indicate that this person is “complete” thanks to the “Declare as complete” label in the Personal Data tab. A huge time saver!

    IMPORT INDEXES
    From now on, the genealogist can retrieve indexes created by fellow genealogists or in other Heredis genealogy files. Retrieve his or her entire work on the places, including media, place descriptions, etc. Available for Surnames, Given Names, Occupations, Places and Sources!

    IMPROVEMENTS
    Heredis 2021 is also the result of a long work process between our hands-on users and our development team operating in the background to continuously improve the software. And, even more remarkably, this work was in part processed during the lockdown period when each of our developers was working remotely, yet still keeping in touch with users. Here are some of this new version’s improvements, which you will find both familiar and different at the same time:

    • Smart Search: take advantage of the option to process an entire selection of events, facts, or do searches within the note of a media; you may also perform searches on Ahnentafel numbers, implexes, or between one generation and another, • Custom reports: -additional fields: “creation date” and “change date” of a person; -a new option in the Places report: grouping a place name and its variants,
    • Merging assistant: alerts during merges have been added to encourage users to merge parents first and thus avoid mistakes…,
    • Swap parents easily: do so if one of your ancestor’s father or mother were inverted by mistake. The correction will be applied to all siblings,
    • Hide empty boxes in the ancestors’ tree chart from now on and get a better view of all available or missing data (Family tab > Ancestors),
    • Add a filter to Search Tracking to display treetops only: a real time saver that will let you see what is left to do and what to start with! Improvements galore to make a real difference in the genealogist everyday use of Heredis.

    AVAILABILITY
    Heredis 2021 for Windows and for Mac have been made available to all genealogists since September 22, 2020 on heredis.com and on the App Store.

  • 1 Oct 2020 10:19 AM | Anonymous
    Did you catch Covid-19? Perhaps you should blame your ancestors.
    According to an article by Maggie Fox in the CNN website:
    “Genes inherited from Neanderthal ancestors may be involved in some cases of severe Covid-19 disease, researchers in Germany reported Wednesday.
    A team of experts on Neanderthal genetics examined a strand of DNA that has been associated with some of the more serious cases of Covid-19 and compared it to sequences known to have been passed down to living Europeans and Asians from Neanderthal ancestors.
    The DNA strand is found on chromosome 3, and a team of researchers in Europe has linked certain variations in this sequence with the risk of being more severely ill with Covid-19.
    ‘Here, we show that the risk is conferred by a genomic segment … that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50% of people in South Asia and about 16% of people in Europe today,’ Svante Paabo and Hugo Zeberg of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology wrote, in a paper accepted for publication in the journal Nature.”
    You can find the full article at: https://cnn.it/3jnaeYD.
  • 1 Oct 2020 5:00 AM | Anonymous

    BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

    Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often. (My computers automatically make off-site backups of all new files every few minutes.)

    Given the events of the past few months with genealogy websites laying off employees and cutting back on services, you now need backup copies of everything more than ever. What happens if the company that holds your online data either goes off line or simply deletes the service where your data is held? If you have copies of everything stored either in your own computer or stored in a different company’s online service, such a loss would be inconvenient but not a disaster.

    Of course, you might want to back up more than your genealogy files. Family photographs, your checkbook register, all sorts of word processing documents, email messages, and much more need to be backed up regularly. Why not do that on the first day of each month?

  • 30 Sep 2020 4:00 PM | Anonymous

    The following announcement was written by the State Archives of North Carolina:

    After several years of digitizing the Division of Negro Education records from the Department of Public Instruction record group, the African American Education digitization project is now completely online!

    This digital collection covers the day by day interactions of the Division of Negro Education with the African American community. The collection ranges from the early to mid 20th century and includes correspondence, articles, speeches, reports, newspaper clippings and more. You can read about previous additions to this collection in Part OnePart Two, and Part Three of this blog series. The last addition to the collection is the Director’s Office: Newspaper Clippings series. It contains newspaper clippings largely covering racial segregation in education throughout the Southern United States during the 1950’s.

    The following series are now online:

    For more information on African American education, check out these NCpedia pages:

  • 30 Sep 2020 1:43 PM | Anonymous

    Elephind is a great service that searches online digital newspaper collections. Best of all, it is available free of charge.

    Elephind.com is a search engine that operates much like Google, Bing, and other search engines. The one thing that is different with Elephind is that it searches only historical, digitized newspapers. It enables you to search for free across many newspaper sites simultaneously rather than having to visit each collection’s web site separately.

    At this time Elephind has indexed 199,820,058 items from 4,267 newspaper titles. These include such well known sites as Chronicling America (the U.S.’s Library of Congress) and Trove (National Library of Australia), as well as smaller collections like Door County Library in Wisconsin. Many of the smaller newspaper sites are not well known and may be difficult to find with the usual search engines, but they are searchable from Elephind.com. A list of available newspaper collections that have been indexed so far is available at https://bit.ly/2EECuqG.

    Additional newspaper collections are added to Elephind’s indexes frequently.

    I found that Elephind operates in much the same manner as many other search engines. If you already know how to search for things in Google, DuckDuckGo, Bing, Yahoo, or elsewhere, you already know how to use Elephind. In fact, there are two search methods available on Elephind:

    1. When you first visit the site at http://www.elephind.com, you are greeted with a very simple search screen containing one data entry box. You can search for words or phases in much the same way as you do on Google although not all of Google’s sophisticated Boolean search terms are available on Elephind. You can find tips for using the search box at https://bit.ly/2S5mCk7.
    2. When visiting this same site at http://www.elephind.com, you will also see a highlighted link for “Advanced Search.” When you click on that, a more sophisticated search form appears, allowing you to narrow the search to any combination of specific newspaper titles, country, or a range of dates.

    I did a search for my own last name between the years 1811 and 1890 in the United States. It returned far too many “hits” for me to search through; so, I started narrowing the search by specifying first names and cities or towns of interest. I was soon looking at information of interest.

    I was impressed with the clarity of the newspaper pages I was able to view; but, of course, that is under the control of the individual newspaper collection. Elephind does not host the images on its own web site. Instead, it merely links to newspapers found on a wide variety of servers in a number of different countries from around the world.

    Elephind.com is a great tool for family historians, genealogists, and researchers to search historic, digitized newspaper archives from around the globe. Will Elephind locate newspaper articles about your ancestors? There is no way to tell in advance. You need to try it for a while to see. It is a free resource, so why not try it to see for yourself?

    Elephind may be found at http://www.elephind.com.

    Elephind is continuing to add more newspapers, so if at first you can’t find what you’re looking for, check back later. You also might want to add your name to the Elephind mailing list at https://dlconsulting646.activehosted.com/f/5 to receive an email message whenever a new collection is added.


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